Happy New Year

IMG_4811

Ringo mittens

Snowy owl mittens

Here’s to a New Year filled with adventure and creativity!

Some of my best-loved knits this past year were colourwork accessories for little ones. Barbara Gregory’s Ringo the raccoon and Horatio the snowy owl mittens are two classics – both patterns are available from Twist Collective. Ringo even made an appearance in my #2016bestnine, worked in two of my all-time favourite yarns, Jamieson & Smith 2 Ply Jumper Weight and Shetland Supreme Jumper Weight.

I wish you all happy knitting and woolly goodness in 2017.

Kambur

Kambur

Kambur

Kambur is my first lopapeysa, or Icelandic sweater. I picked up a copy of Védís Jónsdóttir’s Knitting with Icelandic Wool / Prjónað úr íslenskri ull at the Álafoss Wool Store last summer. I highly recommend the book if you’re a fan of Icelandic knits, as many knitters are!

I knit my Kambur in various colours of Diamond Galway and Galway Highland Heathers. It’s a size two, which turned out to be just the right size for my one-year-old nephew, Stellan.

I’ll close with an inside-out WIP shot of this sweet little pullover. For those new to stranded knitting, I have always found it helpful to knit on the wrong side. That way, I don’t have issues with puckering and my tension is much more even. If you’re a tight knitter by nature, as I am, give it a go!

Kambur

[Ravelled]

Flip-top gloves for Jeremy

Flip-Top Gloves

I had so much fun working on these custom flip-top gloves for Jeremy. I modelled the stranded colourwork after a traditional Newfoundland trigger mitt pattern called diamond check, with a salt and pepper palm and corrugated ribbing on the mitten flap.

Flip-Top Gloves

The buttons were an excellent find, and a perfect match for the navy wool. Nicole Sibonney, owner of Americo Original on Queen Street West in Toronto, helped me pick them out. They were handmade in Italy out of tagua nut, the so-called vegetable ivory because of its resemblance to tusks. Americo is my favourite source for buttons – fine buttons really do make all the difference in the finished product.

Flip-Top Gloves

[Ravelled]

1000 Stitches for Syria

Karusellen

25,000 Syrian refugees are arriving in Canada this winter. The first group arrived in Toronto on December 11 and our new Prime Minister did a fantastic job in greeting them. I believe wholeheartedly in a warm welcome and thankfully, groups of knitters have sprung up across the country to help make this happen. There’s 1000 Stitches for Syria, based in Toronto, and 25 000 tuques in Quebec with a great slogan: “Because in Quebec, the only true enemy is the cold.”

I knit my bit and made my first contribution to 1000 Stitches for Syria this weekend. Erica-Knits’ Karusellen toque (from Pom Pom Quarterly, Issue 14) will be going to one of the new permanent residents of Canada. I wish them success and happiness in this country of ours.

For more information
1000 Stitches for Syria: 1000stitches.org
25 000 tuques: jdussot.wix.com/25000tuques
CBC: Quebecer launches online knitting campaign to help Syrian refugees

[Ravelled]

Niece and nephew knits

wee Chickadee by Ysolda Teague
wee Chickadee by Ysolda Teague
Lancelot by Solenn Couix-Loarer
Lancelot by Solenn Couix-Loarer
My nephew Stellan was born in April, so naturally I’ve been amassing a slew of new-to-me little-person knit patterns. The first sweater I knit him was a Livingston pullover (not pictured), which remains my favourite baby pattern (along with the Umbilical Cord Hat from Stitch ‘n Bitch). For the winter, I’ve made him a wee slipped stitch sweater to go along with a wee colourwork cardi for his big sister, Sibella.

The green pullover is Lancelot by Solenn Couix-Loarer and from the notes on the project pages on Ravelry, it appears to have stumped a fair number of knitters. I think the pattern is correct, but the wording could be clearer around the markers. For the placket set up and neck shaping, the marker referred to in row 1 is the start of row marker. Other than that, it was all good and I’m really happy with the result.

Wee Chickadee is one of Ysolda Teague’s patterns, pictured top, and was an absolute joy to knit. The piece is knit flat; no steeking required for the stranded yoke. I used Jamieson & Smith 2 ply jumper weight, and I love the look of the oatmeal heather against the contrasting colours. And the buttons! My sister gave them to me years ago, and I think they’re the perfect fit. They’re walnut, and were made by the Prairie Knitters at the Old Strathcona Farmers’ Market in Edmonton, Alberta.

For more knitting updates, follow me on Instagram.

Funchal Twisted Wrap

Funchal Fair Isle Twisted Wrap Funchal Fair Isle Twisted Wrap Funchal Fair Isle Twisted Wrap

This was a lot of fun to knit. I love stranded colourwork and I love Jamieson & Smith’s 100 per cent Shetland wool. Couldn’t go wrong with this pattern either: Kate Davies’ Funchal Moebius!

I did adapt it by adding a full twist rather than forming a Moebius strip as written. I also shortened it so it fits comfortably around the neck rather than shoulders.

The piece is knit in the round, as a tube, and then grafted together after the twist. Fun, fun, fun! I came across The Purl Bee’s video tutorial for Kitchener stitch, which I think is helpful if you haven’t grafted before, or need a refresher before diving in.

I hope you enjoy wearing it, Jane! And a very happy holiday to all!

[Ravelled]

Ecclefechan Mitts

Ecclefechan Mitts

The fabric of these mitts almost looks woven. I used a worsted spun, 100 per cent Shetland wool yarn from Jamieson & Smith’s Shetland Heritage line. The result is a soft fabric with a smooth finish.

Ecclefechan Mitts Ecclefechan Mitts

Kate Davies designed the pattern; an interpretation of traditional two-colour gloves made in Dentdale and the Scottish Borders. Ecclefechan, a Borders’ village, is on the map as the birthplace of satirist Thomas Carlyle, as well as for its butter tarts. If you need incentive, the pattern comes with a recipe!

[Ravelled]

Newfoundland Trigger Finger Mittens

Newfoundland Trigger Finger Mittens

Newfoundland Trigger Finger Mittens

Three fingers are kept together for warmth, while the index or ‘trigger’ finger and thumb are separated in these traditional mittens from Newfoundland and Labrador. I first came across the concept at a 2011 David Blackwood exhibition at the AGO in Toronto. Blackwood is a printmaker, known for his use of the intaglio technique where depressions are cut into a printing plate. He also works in woodcuts, paintings and drawings. I loved this etching, For Edgar Glover: The Splitting Table (Emma Butler Gallery), in particular.

For Edgar Glover: The Splitting Table by David Blackwood, 1999 (Emma Butler Gallery)
For Edgar Glover: The Splitting Table by David Blackwood, 1999 (Emma Butler Gallery)

I’ve dug up a couple of patterns in the years since: Mrs. Martin’s Finger Mitts by Harriet Pardy Martin, which was published in Favorite Mittens by Robin Hansen; and the one I ultimately used to make these mitts for Chris, which is from Operation Homespun: Traditional knitting patterns of Newfoundland & Labrador.

Newfoundland Trigger Finger Mittens

[Ravelled]

Tortoise and Hare Gauntlets

Tortoise and Hare Gauntlets

My brother asked me to make these gauntlets for a friend in Japan using Kate Davies’ Tortoise and Hare pattern. I’m a huge fan of Jamieson & Smith’s Shetland wool and had picked up four shades quite a while ago with this pattern in mind.

I initially knit the longer version, on larger needles and ended up with a gauntlet that stretched up to my elbow. So … I ripped it out and started again using smaller needles and fewer pattern repeats.

Tortoise and Hare Gauntlets

I love the look of the braiding after the ribbed cuff, and of course the tortoise and hare motif. After the sizing and gauge issues were figured out this was a very enjoyable knit. There will be more tortoises and hares in my future!

[Ravelled]

Narwhal Mittens

Narwhal Mittens

Narwhal Mittens

Happy Holidays! I’m taking a break from a Christmas goose-filled haze to share the last of my holiday knits. These mittens were so much fun to make. Not only is Ysolda Teague’s pattern a fantastic one, and Quince & Co. Chickadee really very nice to work stranded knitting with… but they have narwhals on them! Knowing how Jane feels about narwhals, they were a perfect fit!

Enjoy the rest of the year – here’s to a wonderful 2013!

Note: the main colour is Peacock (109) and the contrasting colour is Glacier (105)

[Ravelled]