Ecclefechan Mitts

May 18th, 2014

Ecclefechan Mitts

The fabric of these mitts almost looks woven. I used a worsted spun, 100 per cent Shetland wool yarn from Jamieson & Smith’s Shetland Heritage line. The result is a soft fabric with a smooth finish.

Ecclefechan Mitts Ecclefechan Mitts

Kate Davies designed the pattern; an interpretation of traditional two-colour gloves made in Dentdale and the Scottish Borders. Ecclefechan, a Borders’ village, is on the map as the birthplace of satirist Thomas Carlyle, as well as for its butter tarts. If you need incentive, the pattern comes with a recipe!

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Pure Qiviut Hat

April 18th, 2014

100 per cent qiviut hat

Lightweight and oh, so soft, 100 per cent qiviut is wonderful to knit with. Not to mention warm; it’s eight times warmer than sheep’s wool. I have knit with qiviut before, blended with Merino wool and silk, but this was a new experience. What you see here is undyed qiviut, so 100 per cent natural colour as well.

Qiviut is musk oxen fleece, and it feels more like cashmere than anything else. Most musk oxen live in the Canadian Arctic and Greenland but they were recently reintroduced to Alaska, where they’re farmed. I came across this video from the University of Alaska Fairbanks, showing how qiviut is harvested in a farming environment. Shedding takes place naturally on the tundra but here the qiviut is combed out in a synchronous shed that looks like a blanket.

100 per cent qiviut

100 per cent qiviut hat

Some sources for qiviut yarn:

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Newfoundland Trigger Finger Mittens

January 11th, 2014

Newfoundland Trigger Finger Mittens

Newfoundland Trigger Finger Mittens

Three fingers are kept together for warmth, while the index or ‘trigger’ finger and thumb are separated in these traditional mittens from Newfoundland and Labrador. I first came across the concept at a 2011 David Blackwood exhibition at the AGO in Toronto. Blackwood is a printmaker, known for his use of the intaglio technique where depressions are cut into a printing plate. He also works in woodcuts, paintings and drawings. I loved this etching, For Edgar Glover: The Splitting Table (Emma Butler Gallery), in particular.

For Edgar Glover: The Splitting Table by David Blackwood, 1999 (Emma Butler Gallery)

For Edgar Glover: The Splitting Table by David Blackwood, 1999 (Emma Butler Gallery)

I’ve dug up a couple of patterns in the years since: Mrs. Martin’s Finger Mitts by Harriet Pardy Martin, which was published in Favorite Mittens by Robin Hansen; and the one I ultimately used to make these mitts for Chris, which is from Operation Homespun: Traditional knitting patterns of Newfoundland & Labrador.

Newfoundland Trigger Finger Mittens

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Tortoise and Hare Gauntlets

October 30th, 2013

Tortoise and Hare Gauntlets

My brother asked me to make these gauntlets for a friend in Japan using Kate Davies’ Tortoise and Hare pattern. I’m a huge fan of Jamieson & Smith’s Shetland wool and had picked up four shades quite a while ago with this pattern in mind.

I initially knit the longer version, on larger needles and ended up with a gauntlet that stretched up to my elbow. So … I ripped it out and started again using smaller needles and fewer pattern repeats.

Tortoise and Hare Gauntlets

I love the look of the braiding after the ribbed cuff, and of course the tortoise and hare motif. After the sizing and gauge issues were figured out this was a very enjoyable knit. There will be more tortoises and hares in my future!

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Miss Marple

October 19th, 2013

Miss Marple

Miss Marple

I think the ceramic buttons are my favourite thing about this little cardi. They’re from karoArt’s Etsy store and were handmade in Ireland.

The pattern is seamless and a quick knit in a worsted weight yarn; I used Cascade Yarns 220 Superwash in royal purple. No problems to speak of – I’m a fan of Nadia Crétin-Léchenne’s sweet patterns for little ones. The sweater fits 12-18 months and only took one and a half balls of yarn.

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Puppy Kerchief

August 4th, 2013

Hayden

Meet Hayden the Vizsla. He’s a new addition to my cousin’s family, and a pretty cute one at that. I knit a little tweed kerchief to welcome him. As I tend to do with babies, I overestimated his size but I’m confident he’ll grow into it!

If you’d like to make one yourself, I used a ball of Rowan Felted Tweed DK and 3.5 mm (US 4) needles. This is more of an improvisation than a pattern, and I didn’t measure my gauge. What I did do was the following:

Cast on three stitches.

Slipping the first stitch, knit to the last stitch and then knit into the front and back of it (you’ve increased one stitch). Repeat this for every row until desired size is reached, then cast off loosely, weave in ends and block.

Hayden

[Photos courtesy of Christopher]

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Immie Tee

June 29th, 2013

Immie Tee

The absolute cuteness of baby knits has not worn off for me. After countless little hats and a few tiny sweaters, I still find myself inordinately delighted by how adorable they are.

This yellow tee is for my niece Sibella – she’ll be one in August! The yarn is Tern from Quince & Co., and it’s a blend of wool and silk.

Immie Tee

Immie Tee

The bit of silk makes for a nice, lightweight knit. The colourway, Buoy, is really quite muted, and there’s a slight variation in hue due to the differences in the way wool and silk being absorb dye.

The pattern is by Carrie Bostick Hoge, who has plenty of very sweet baby knits to choose from. In fact, one is named Sibella; a natural fit … maybe for birthday number two!

Wishing you a very happy Canada Day long weekend, and a happy Pride to all those in Toronto!

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Alpaca throw: Northern Hemisphere edition

June 16th, 2013

Cradle Me throw

More alpaca – this time hailing from Beneath the Sun Alpacas in St. Ann’s, Ontario. I have my cousin Paul to thank for hooking me up with this lovely, local yarn. It’s 80 per cent alpaca and 20 per cent Merino wool, and the alpacas’ names are Puff, Smoke and Malbec. Owner Genie told me that the sheep’s name is unknown. Ha.

Cradle Me throw

Cradle Me throw - detail

The pattern is one I was contemplating for my niece – Cradle Me by Anne Hanson. Because of my gauge, the smallest size ended up measuring 48″ x 41.5″ – a nice-sized throw for my sister. The lace pattern is fun to work and easy to memorize. I’m thinking I might make an even larger version with some heavier-weight Ecological Wool that I have in my stash. Super cozy!

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Alpaca throw: Southern Hemisphere edition

May 20th, 2013
Blue Moon Alpacas

Blue Moon Alpacas

I think his name is Biscuit, a Blue Moon alpaca

I think his name is Biscuit

You may remember these guys from a post way back, on Blue Moon Alpacas in Stawell, Victoria. Just over three years ago we were in Australia on one of my favourite trips ever, and I picked up a bag of beautiful, natural grey DK-weight alpaca from Glenda as we passed through the Grampians.

Hansel hap shawl

Hansel hap shawl

The good news is I finally put it to use in Gudrun Johnston’s Hansel hap shawl pattern. The pattern calls for contrasting colours in the hap shell lace portion, which I initially tried with some stash alpaca in teal, mustard and white. I ended up ripping it out and sticking with a solid colour, mostly because the Blue Moon Alpacas yarn is so special and I wanted to really highlight it.

The yarn is glossy, soft and springy, and I left the tiniest bits of vegetable matter in the throw, so we can have more bits of Australia in our Toronto apartment.

Hansel hap shawl

Hansel hap shawl

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Aidez Cardigan

April 20th, 2013
Aidez Cardigan

Photos: Christopher Lewis

Aidez Cardigan

My sister is rightly concerned that I’ll never pop this cardigan in the mail. I love it! I have some Cascade Ecological Wool in my stash that is now destined to be an Aidez for me. Since the pattern calls for a super bulky yarn, it was indeed a quick knit. I finished the majority of it on the train and plane a few weeks ago. It made for perfect travel knitting; the five different cable charts are easily memorized.

Detail of the trellis cable back panel

Detail of the trellis cable back panel

Detail of seed wishbone pattern on sleeves

Detail of seed wishbone pattern on sleeves

The pattern is a free one from Cirilia Rose via Berroco. I used the 100 per cent wool yarn called for - Berroco Peruvia Quick in Fumar – which is a really lovely, soft yarn that results in a lightweight but warm fabric.

[Photos courtesy of Christopher]

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